Potato Cabbage Gratin

January 2, 2009

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Here’s a great way to warm your family on a cold winter’s night … It’s also easy to make. You can steam the cabbage while you simmer the potatoes. Buy a firm, fresh head and sprinkle it with lemon juice before you steam it to avoid the cabbage smell.

1 pound waxy potatoes (4 medium)
1 1/2 pounds cabbage (1 1/2 head)
juice of 1 lemon
1 pound onions (2 medium large)
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
4 ounces log chèvre
4 ounces water
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon unseasoned breadcrumbs, divided
grated whole nutmeg to taste
sea salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste

In the bottom of a 3- or 4-quart steamer pan, cover the potatoes with cold water and bring to a boil. Slice the cabbage into 2-inch wedges, place in the steamer basket and sprinkle with the lemon juice. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer until tender, 10 to 15 minutes for the cabbage, 20 to 25 minutes for the potatoes. Drain, cool, and roughly chop each and set aside.

Slice the onions, thinly. In a large chef’s pan over medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon of oil and add the onions. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and sweat until translucent, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Grease a shallow 1 1/2-quart gratin and set aside.

In a small saucier over extremely low heat, combine the chèvre, water, and bay leaf. Stir with a whisk until melted.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine the potatoes, cabbage, and onions. Fold in the chèvre mixture and 1/2 cup breadcrumbs.  Season with nutmeg, salt, and pepper.  Turn into the prepared gratin and top with the remaining breadcrumbs and 1 tablespoon oil.  Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until browned.
Makes 4 servings.


Cabbage Bean Soup for a Crowd

February 20, 2008


Creative Commons photo by jamelah

While a monastery might seem an ironic place for honeymooners to lodge, many monasteries support themselves by offering guest quarters, a few of them even allowing romantic cohabitation.  Some require guests to observe rules of silence, or to participate in the work and worship of the monks; others merely offer quiet, clean accommodations and good, simple food for body and soul.  This recipe would probably serve an entire monastery full of people. – Almostgotit

Serves 50-60

8 pounds ground chuck
8 onions, chopped
8  14-ounce cans chicken broth
8 14-ounce cans beef broth
8  30-ounce cans diced tomatoes
16 15-oz. cans kidney beans, drained
2 cabbages, sliced
4 pounds carrots, sliced (or baby carrots, cut in half)
3 Tablespoons Worchestershire sauce
6 cups water

Brown beef with onion.  Drain well.  Add all other ingredients.  Bring to a simmer and cook until vegetables are tender, approximately one hour.  May add more Worchestershire sauce, garlic, or beef bouillion to taste.  No extra salt is needed.


Pickled Slaw

July 20, 2007

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As long as we’re making favorites, here’s my favorite slaw. Don’t worry if it looks like there’s not enough dressing at first. As the cabbage pickles in the fridge, it gives up lots of juice. This slaw is especially good with Baked Beans, hot dogs, and hamburgers. I also like it with curried red dal. More on that great dish later. SAM

1/2 head cabbage (1 1/2 pounds)
1 large sweet onion
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup white or red wine vinegar
1/2 cup honey
1 tablespoon celery seeds

Thinly slice the cabbage and onion and combine in a medium mixing bowl. In a small saucepan over high heat, combine the oil, vinegar, honey, and celery seed and bring to a full boil. Pour the boiling dressing over the cabbage-onion mixture and stir thoroughly. Press down the slaw with a plate and place a 5-pound weight on top. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerator for two days, stirring once a day. Remove the plate and weight and seal in an airtight container. The slaw will keep in the fridge for two weeks.
Makes 10 servings.


Cooking Tip: Variations on Pickled Slaw

July 20, 2007

Instead of olive oil, you can substitute a milder oil like safflower or peanut. Sugar works as well as honey. For a sweet-and-sour slaw, omit the honey and use 1 cup sugar.